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EECS 1012: LAB 5 – More Computational Thinking
A. REMINDERS
1) You should attend your own lab session (the one you are enrolled in). If you need to change your lab
enrollment, you should go to the department. Instructors or TAs cannot change your enrollment. TAs
are available via Zoom to help you during your lab hours.
2) You are required to pass the pre-lab mini quiz posted on eClass not later than the first 10 minutes of
your lab time. You should study the recent course materials and corresponding links/hints and
Section B of this document, as well as working on at least first tasks of this lab before trying the
prelab quiz. You have 4 attempts; and you need at least 80% to pass. However, each time you may get
some different questions. You should try your first attempt at least one day before your deadline so
that, if needed, you have time to (re)study the materials for your next attempts. Failing the pre-lab
mini quiz is equal to failing the whole lab, yet you are still highly encouraged to complete the lab and
submit your work to eClass.
3) You can also have your work verified and graded during the lab sessions. Feel free to signal a TA for
help if you stuck on any of the steps below. Yet, note that TAs would need to help other students too.
4) You can submit your lab work in eClass any time before 21:00 on Wednesday of the week the lab is
for. In order to pass this lab, your grade in it should be at least 70%.
B. IMPORTANT PRE-LAB WORK YOU NEED TO DO BEFORE GOING TO THE LAB
1) Download this lab’s files and read them carefully to the end.
2) See the sample solution to Lab04.
3) You should have a good understanding of
• Iterations: while, do-while and for loop symbols as introduced in the lecture notes
• JS operator for division and modulus operator
• JS prompt box; as well as console.log for debugging purposes when needed
4) Practice drawing flowchart symbols in PowerPoint (MS Word or draw.io, etc.). If you plan to draw
your flowcharts on paper, you may want to use pencils, erasers, and perhaps a ruler to make it neat.
C. GOALS/OUTCOMES FOR LAB
• To practice more on computational thinking and implement the solutions in JavaScript.
D. TASKS
1) You first and major task in this lab is to draw seven flowcharts. This task must be done in teams of two;
not fewer, not more. (By the permission of the TA, only one team can have three members if the lab
population is odd.) When you are done, you should show your flowcharts to the TAs before you go to
next part. The TA may ask you to make minor modifications to your flowcharts to demonstrate your
computational thinking skills in those contexts.
2) Then, you are provided with ct.html, document and supporting files such as ct.css and ct.js.
Your task is to translate your seven flowcharts to JavaScript code.
3) You will generate at least five html and js files in this process. You should demo each HTML file to the
TA. For that, please, have each html file open in a different tab so you can show the progression.
4) See the following few pages for details on how to modify your html and js files.
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E. SUBMISSION
1) Manual verification by a TA
You may want to have your TA verifying your lab before submission. The TA will look at your various files
in their progression. The TA may also ask you to make minor modifications to the lab to demonstrate
your knowledge of the materials. The TA can then record your grade in the system.
2) EClass submission
You will see an assignment submission link on EClass. Create a folder named“Lab5” and copy all of your
lab materials inside (img_{09,10,11,12,13,14,15.jpg; ct_Ex{9,10,11,12,13,14,15} .html
and ct_Ex{9,10,11,12,13,14,15}.js). This folder should be compressed (or tar.gz) and the
compressed file submitted.
F. COMPUTATIONAL THINKING
Part 1: This exercise must be done in teams of two (with the permission of the TA, only one team can be in
team of three if the lab population is odd). If you have done it at home, you must discuss it with a peer from
your lab before you show your final solution to your TA.
Using a computer program (or a pen and pencil), draw the following flowcharts and write your name on each.
By end of this lab, you should take a screenshot (or a picture) from each flowchart and both you and your
teammate should submit them to EClass as img_{09,10,11,12,13,14,15}.jpg files, where img_x is the flowchart
of exercise x below. Try to keep the size of each image below 500 KB, e.g., by reducing the resolution of your
camera.
IMPORTANT: You are required to use the symbols introduced in the lecture which are inspired from this book
(“Computer Science: a first course” by Forsythe, Keenan, Organick, Stenberg).
IMPORTANT: You are required to provide preconditions and postconditions for each solution you provide.
IMPORTANT: In Ex 9 to 12, you are not allowed to use strings. Instead, you should work with numbers and
math operators, such as division, modulus, etc.
Ex 9) Devise a flowchart to receive a positive number and output each digit separately. For instance, if the
input is 692, the program should output 2, 9, 6. Another example, if the number is 135429 the
program should out put 9, 2, 4, 5, 3, and 1.
Ex 10) Devise a flowchart to receive a positive number and output how many of its digits are equal to 7.
For instance, if the input is 772, the program should output 2, because there are two sevens there.
Another example, if the input is 14368, the program should output 0.
Ex 11) Devise a flowchart to receive a positive number and output sum of its digits. For instance, if the
input is 63932, the program should output 23, because 6+3+9+3+2 is 23. Another example, if the
input is 23 the program should output 5.
Ex 12) Devise a flowchart to receive a positive number and output “yes” if it’s equal to its reverse;
otherwise, output “no”. For instance, if the input is 63936, the program should output “yes”,
because if you read the digits from left to right or from right to left, it’s the same number. But, if the
input is 632, the program should output “no” because 632 is not the same as 236.
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Ex 13) Devise an algorithm to receive a positive number, as n, and output n! (n Factorial).
Ex 14) Devise an algorithm to input an integer greater than 1, as n, and output the first n values of the
Fibonacci sequence. In Fibonacci sequence, the first two values are 0 and 1 and other values are
sum of the two values preceding it. For instance, if the input is 4, the program should print 0, 1, 1,
2,. As another example, if the input is 9, the program should output 0, 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21,.
By the way, after you are done with Ex 14, learn more about applications of Fibonacci number in
real life here: http://www.ijesi.org/papers/Vol(6)9/Version-3/B0609030714.pdf . There might be a
question on this in the pre-lab mini quiz.
Ex 15) Devise an algorithm to input a positive integer, n, – and by using XX characters – output the figure
below that has n rows and each row k has k pairs of XX. For instance, if input is 5, the figure on the
left (and if the input is 12, the figure on the right) should be generated by the program.
Show all your flowcharts to your TA before going to Part 2. The TAs may ask any teammate some questions
about the flowcharts, they may also ask you to modify your flowcharts slightly.
Part 2: you are given ct.html, ct.css, ct.js files. By reading these files carefully, you can enhance your learning
before diving to details of exercises below. In this part, you translate your flowcharts of Part 1 to JavaScript
code.
Exercise 9. Copy ct.html to a new file named ct_Ex9.html. Copy ct.js to a new file named ct_Ex9.js.
Launch ct_Ex9.html with your browser and click on the button, nothing happens. In this exercise, you translate
your flowchart of Ex 9 of Part 1 to its equivalent JavaScript code. First let’s fix some html code:
Make four changes to ct_Ex9.html, as follows:
1) Connect it to ct_Ex9.js by fixing the script tag in the head element.
2) Correct the header h1 of the document to show “Separating Digits of a Positive Integer”
3) Correct the name of the event function of the button to be “problem_09()”
4) Add your name to the list of authors of this page.
Also, follow these guidelines in your ct_Ex9.js:
◼ Make sure name of the function is proper.
◼ Part of the function has been provided for you; if you run your program at this point, it receives a
number, but it does not separate the digits, and it stops. You should use your flowchart that you drew
in Part 1 to complete the function.
◼ In your flowchart, you should have a loop, perhaps a while loop (or a do-while), translate it to js
starting from line 20 of ct_Ex9.js.
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Once you are done, run the program, you should see the following results if you enter 3498 or 100123873. If
not, debug your code (Shift+Ctrl+J in Firefox).

Before going to next exercise, make sue your JS code is a good match to your flowchart for this problem. If
not, you should fix this mismatch.
Exercise 10. Copy ct_Ex9.html and ct_Ex9.js to new files named ct_Ex10.html and ct_Ex10.js.
In this exercise, you translate your flowchart of Ex 10 of Part 1 to its equivalent JavaScript code.
In the js file of previous exercise, you (should have) separated digits of a number by modulus and division
operators. Now, in ct_Ex10.js, you need to make the following changes
◼ Name of the function should be problem10()
◼ In line 15, change the output message from “its digits” to “number of 7’s”
◼ Before entering the loop (e.g. in line 19), declare a counter variable and assign 0 to it.
◼ Inside the loop, after you separated a digit (by modulus operator) check if it’s equal to 7 or not, if yes,
add to the counter.
◼ You perhaps had an output box inside the loop in your flowchart of Exercise 9; and, you probably do
not have an output box inside the loop in you Exercise 10’s flowchart. Instead, you should have an
output box after the loop iterations are over to show how many 7’s you’ve counted. If that’s the case,
translate that output box to a js statement like this:
outputObj.innerHTML=outputObj.innerHTML+counter;
Also, you need to make 3 changes in your ct_EX10.html: script, header h1, and name of the event function.
Once you are done, run the program, you should see the following results if you enter 789041 or 5323653345.
If not, debug your code (Shift+Ctrl+J in Firefox).

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Before going to next exercise, make sue your JS code is a good match to your flowchart for this problem. If
not, you should fix this mismatch.
Exercise 11. Copy ct_Ex10.html and ct_Ex10.js to new files named ct_Ex11.html and ct_Ex11.js.
In this exercise, you translate your flowchart of Ex 11 of Part 1 to its equivalent JavaScript code.
First, in ct_Ex11.js, you need to make the following changes
◼ Name of the function should be problem11()
◼ In line 15, change the output message from “number of 3’s” to “sum of digits”.
◼ In line 19 of ct_Ex10.js, you had declared a counter variable and assigned 0 to it. Just change name of
that to sum, because here you do not count anything, you just add the digits together.
◼ In your flowchart of Ex 10, inside the loop, after you separated a digit (by modulus operator), you
checked if it’s equal to 3 or not. We no longer need that if statement here. Instead, add the separated
digit to sum.
◼ You have an output box after the loop iterations are over; but, you are not going to output counter
any more, you output sum. In that case, the statement should look like this:
outputObj.innerHTML=outputObj.innerHTML+sum;
Also, you need to make 3 changes in your ct_EX11.html, similar to those you made in ct_Ex10.html.
Once you are done, run the program, you should see the following result if you enter 234561. If not, debug
your code (Shift+Ctrl+J in Firefox).
Before going to next exercise, make sue your JS code is a good match to your flowchart for this problem. If
not, you should fix this mismatch.
Exercise 12. Copy ct_Ex11.html and ct_Ex11.js to new files named ct_Ex12.html and ct_Ex12.js.
In this exercise, you translate your flowchart of Ex 12 of Part 1 to its equivalent JavaScript code.
Several changes that you need to make here are minor changes like what you did in Exercise 11 in
ct_Ex11.html and ct_Ex11.js. So, we do not re-state them again here, to encourage you to make such changes
independently and with minimum guidance.
In the loop of your flowchart for Ex 12 of Part 1, you may separate the digits and make the reverse of the input
number along the way—i.e., in loop iterations. For instance, assume the input number is 235, before entering
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the loop, you should declare a variable reverse and initialized it to 0 as well as storing the input number in a
variable, let’s call it temp.
In the first iteration of the loop, you will have:
235 modulus 10 is 5; and, the reverse number that you currently have, which is 0, times 10 plus 5 is 5
and you store it in variable reverse; then, you reduce 235 to 23 by dividing it by 10.
Now, in the second iteration of the loop, you will have:
23 modulus 10 is 3; and, the reverse number that you currently have, which is 5, times 10 plus 3 is 53
and you store it in variable reverse; then, you reduce 23 to 2 by dividing it by 10.
Now, in the third iteration of the loop, you will have:
2 modulus 10 is 2; and, the reverse number that you currently have, which is 53, times 10 plus 2 is 532
and you store it in variable reverse; then, you reduce 2 to 0 by dividing it by 10.
Because the number is already reduced to zero, there is no more iteration. In other words, we exit the loop.
Now, we should compare the initial number (235) by its reverse (532)—that we built within loop iterations. If
they are equal, we output “yes”; otherwise we output “no”. As a hint, below, we show you part of a flowchart
that you may have for this exercise. You should be able to write the body of the loop based on example that
we explained above.
a
temp  a
reverse  0
a ≠ 0
False
True
temp=reverse
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Once you are done, run the program, you should see the following result if you enter 23432 or 897. If not,
debug your code (Shift+Ctrl+J in JavaScript).

Before going to next exercise, make sue your JS code is a good match to your flowchart for this problem. If
not, you should fix this mismatch.
Exercise 13. Copy ct_Ex12.html and ct_Ex12.js to new files named ct_Ex13.html and ct_Ex13.js.
In this exercise, you translate your flowchart of Ex 13 of Part 1 to its equivalent JavaScript code.
Several changes that you need to make here are minor changes like what you did in previous exercises in html
and js files. So, we do not re-state them again here, to encourage you to make such changes independently
and with minimum guidance. Make sure name of the event function is factorial().
The major difference between the flowchart of this exercise compare to those of previous exercises is that the
number of iterations in this exercise is deterministic. In other words, we know how many iterations needs to
be made—in advance. For instance, for calculating 5!, five iterations is required. No more no less, whereas in
previous exercises we did not know how many digits the input number will have. Therefore, we did not know
how many iterations the loop will need. Hence, none of the previous exercises should have been solved with a
for loop. Ex 13, though, can be devised with a for loop.
Once you are done, run the program, you should see the following result if you enter 6 or 0. If not, debug your
code (Shift+Ctrl+J in Firefox).

Before going to next exercise, make sue your JS code is a good match to your flowchart for this problem. If
not, you should fix this mismatch.
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Exercise 14. Copy ct_Ex13.html and ct_Ex13.js to new files named ct_Ex14.html and ct_Ex14.js.
In this exercise, you translate your flowchart of Ex 14 of Part 1 to its equivalent JavaScript code.
Several changes that you need to make here are minor changes like what you did in previous exercises in html
and js files. So, we do not re-state them again here. Just make sure name of the event function is
fibonacci(), both in your html and js files.
This exercise can be done with a for loop too, because—as an example—if the input is 10, the loop should
iterate exactly 8 times. Note that for the first two values, we do not need to iterate; we already know they are
0 and 1.
Hint: As a new value, in Fibonacci sequence, can be constructed by sum of the last and 2nd last values, you may
want to declare three variables:
var secondLast=0;
var last=1;
var newValue;
Note that secondLast and last variables are initially 0 and 1, respectively, because that’s they way
Fibonacci sequence starts.
In the body of the for loop, we calculate newValue and update the values for last and secondLast
variables.
Once you are done, run the program, you should see the following result if you enter 5 or 9. If not, debug your
code (Shift+Ctrl+J in Firefox).

Before going to next exercise, make sue your JS code is a good match to your flowchart for this problem. If
not, you should fix this mismatch.
Exercise 15. Copy ct_Ex14.html and ct_Ex14.js to new files named ct_Ex15.html and ct_Ex15.js.
In this exercise, you translate your flowchart of Ex 15 of Part 1 to its equivalent JavaScript code.
Several changes that you need to make here are minor changes like what you did in previous exercises in html
and js files. So, we do not re-state them here.
This exercise can be done with for loop, as iterations are deterministic. For instance, if input is 5, we need to
iterate exactly 5 times to output those 5 rows; also, in each row i, we should put i pairs of XX. So, we need to
nest one loop inside another.
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Note: in this exercise you would need to change text alignment to left. You can do this just in your js code.
Also, you would need to make the output font size smaller, let’s say to 11px. For these, you can modify the
style property of outputObj just before you enter the loop, like in line 18 and 19.
Once you are done, run the program, you should see the following result if you enter 5 or 10. If not, debug
your code (Shift+Ctrl+J in Firefox).

G. AFTER-LAB TASKS (THIS PART WILL NOT BE GRADED)
In order to review what you have learned in this lab as well as expanding your skills further, we recommend
the following questions and extra practice:
1) You should revisit the 7 exercises after the lab and learn about the parts of your flowcharts that were
not a good match to your JavaScript code.
a. You may want to do some sort of reverse engineering here: study the JavaScript code that
you eventually developed for each exercise and draw a flowchart for that. Be careful not to
include any JavaScript-specific notation in your flowcharts. Flowcharts should be as
independent as possible from programming languages. That means your flowchart should be
understandable to anyone who knows programming even if he/she does not know any
JavaScript.
b. Hence, your flowchart should not use functions like parseFloat, getElementById, etc., or
keywords like if, else, var, etc. You are also highly discouraged to use “=” for an assignment;
instead you should use “”.
2) Once you have your own 7 flowcharts and corresponding JavaScript code polished, take photos (or
screenshots) of each and add them to your myLearningKit webpage such that when the
corresponding buttons are clicked, your solutions are shown.
3) We will provide you with sample solutions on Feb 12. The sample solution should NOT be used as a
means of learning how to tackle those 7 exercises. Instead, it should be only used as a reference to
compare your own solution with our solution and learn from differences. In general, you cannot learn
much computational thinking skills, if any, by studying a solution without putting your efforts first to
come up with a solution (even a non-perfect one). In other words, you learn Computational Thinking
by actually doing it not by reading it or watching examples. Last but not the least, students who do not
practice Computational Thinking independently or adequately will feel a lot of time pressure during all
upcoming tests and the final exam that would result in low grades.
Please feel free to discuss any of these questions in the course forum or see the TAs and/or Instructors for
help.

LAB 5 – More Computational Thinking
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